Employee Training: Do You Have the Right Salespeople on the Bus?

Employee training is necessary. It’s important.

But employee training shouldn’t stop at new hire on-boarding. Continued training with current employees is equally, if not more important, than initial training.

According to ClearCompany, 76% of employees want opportunities for career growth.

What better way to promote career growth than to focus on continued employee training?

But before you can train, you need to determine if you have the right people on the bus. After all, employee training is a huge investment.

Today’s article is part two in a five-part series on building a winning sales team. Let’s get to it!

Employee Training 101: Having the Right People on the Bus

Do you have the right salespeople on your team?

In the previous article mentioned above, we suggested that your team works through the following questions:

  • What is your purpose?
  • What is your cause?
  • What is your belief?
  • Why does your organization exist?
  • Why do you get out of bed in the morning?
  • And why should anyone care?

This activity will help you to discover where your current sales team stands.

Discovery

So, what did you discover?

  • Is your team on the same page?
  • Did you get a sense of inspiration from your current team? Did they seem confused by the activity?
  • Were you able to “break through” to a new level with your team?
  • What did you learn?

Our hope is that you were able to discover something, even if that something is negative. In fact, there’s a good chance you didn’t like everything that was discovered during your meeting. That’s OK!

Integrity in Selling

The most important trait to us here at CFS is operating from a state of integrity in everything that we do.

Unfortunately, we’ve also discovered that selling as an industry is actually believed by most to be quite the opposite. We’ve asked salespeople and non-salespeople alike the following question:

“What comes to mind when you think of selling and/or salespeople in general?”

The response?

Most said things like:

  • “I think of aggressive salespeople.”
  • “Sleazy, corrupt, fraudulent.”
  • “There is no integrity in selling today.”
  • “Salespeople aren’t honest.”
  • “Trying to get into people’s heads. And possibly trying to rip them off.”

When asked:

“What should change about the industry, if anything?”

The answers were even more telling. We asked random people off the streets of New York City the above question. Here are some of the responses we heard:

  • “Not be so aggressive.”
  • “I’d like to see more honesty.”
  • “If I want something, I seek it out. I’d like to talk to someone that’s helpful and not over the edge.”
  • [Sales]people need to have a more positive attitude.”
  • “Some salespeople don’t recognize that some of the most essential aspects of communication is listening. And when a salesperson listens to the customers’ needs then they are able to best address those needs.”

Do you sense the over-arching theme here? Selling doesn’t have the best reputation, and neither do salespeople.

As a sales training organization, our mission is to change the above picture!

Selling in the Future

Do you want to be on a team or work with a team that is viewed as lying, sleazy, or slimy human beings? My guess is no.

Instead, I’m going to go ahead and assume that you aim to work with a team that is viewed by prospects as honest, helpful, and kind.

So, which of the above best describes the people on your sales team? And how do you believe other people perceive members of your sales team?

Employee Training: Working with the Right People

Is your sales team using shifty tactics to make deals? Do they have a “whatever it takes” mentality? If the answer is yes—and you want to change it—now is the time.

To be clear: this isn’t going to be easy. It’s going to be pretty hard. You are now up against common stereotypes and your goal is to change them.

Here are some questions to consider as you redesign your current sales team. You also might consider meeting as a team to discuss:

  • What does “selling with integrity” mean in our organization? Do we operate in a constant state of integrity?
  • Are we honest with our clients?
  • Do we care about our clients?
  • Is financial gain our only goal?
  • What would our company look like if money meant nothing? How would we act? What would we say?
  • How can our organization change the way we currently operate? What new mindsets do we need to adopt in order to do this?

Now I know all of this seems like a lot of philosophy—and quite frankly, it is! But it’s necessary if you’re looking to build a winning sales team.

If you are looking to implement effective employee training, start with a broader view of your current team first. Make sure you have the right people. The right teammates will understand the importance of sharing your company mission and determining the why. They will also be focused on operating at a new level of integrity moving forward.

Changing the dynamic of your organization isn’t hard with the right questions and the right focus. So go ahead, try it on for size.


How to Build a Winning Sales Team

By | 2016-10-17T16:47:44+00:00 August 16th, 2016|Sales Leaders|2 Comments

About the Author:

Rebecca Smith is the Director of Marketing at Criteria for Success. She writes about sales, sales leadership, social selling best practices, time management, and anything related to helping others discover success. Be sure to say hi on Twitter @RebeckerSmith.

2 Comments

  1. Barry Hall August 16, 2016 at 11:26 am - Reply

    Great post Rebecca keep up the fabulous work. – Barry.

  2. Terri August 21, 2016 at 6:45 pm - Reply

    Very helpful article, thanks for sharing!

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